CrossClj

0.1.4 docs

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RECENT
    VARS
    a
    abbr
    acronym
    address
    applet
    area
    article
    aside
    audio
    b
    base
    basefont
    bdi
    bdo
    big
    blockquote
    body
    br
    button
    canvas
    caption
    center
    cite
    code
    col
    colgroup
    data
    datalist
    dd
    del
    details
    dfn
    dialog
    dir
    div
    dl
    dt
    element
    em
    embed
    fieldset
    figcaption
    figure
    font
    footer
    form
    frame
    frameset
    h1
    h2
    h3
    h4
    h5
    h6
    head
    header
    hr
    html
    i
    iframe
    img
    input
    ins
    kbd
    keygen
    label
    legend
    li
    link
    main
    map
    mark
    menu
    menuitem
    meta
    meter
    nav
    noframes
    noscript
    object
    ol
    optgroup
    option
    output
    p
    param
    pre
    progress
    q
    rp
    rt
    rtc
    ruby
    s
    samp
    script
    section
    select
    shadow
    small
    source
    span
    strong
    style
    sub
    summary
    sup
    table
    tbody
    td
    template
    textarea
    tfoot
    th
    thead
    time
    title
    tr
    track
    u
    ul
    var
    video
    wbr

    « Index of all namespaces of this project

    Content derived from Mozilla Developer Network and individual contributors,
    under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license (CC-BY-SA), v2.5
    The HTML Anchor Element (<a>) defines a hyperlink to a location on the same
    page or any other page on the Web. It can also be used (in an obsolete way)
    to create an anchor point—a destination for hyperlinks within the content of
    a page, so that links aren't limited to connecting simply to the top of a
    page.
    The HTML <abbr> element (or HTML Abbreviation Element) represents an
    abbreviation and optionally provides a full description for it. If present,
    the title attribute must contain this full description and nothing else.
    Example:
    
      <p>I do <abbr title="Hypertext Markup Language">HTML</abbr></p>
    Deprecated
    The HTML Acronym Element (<acronym>) allows authors to clearly indicate a
    sequence of characters that compose an acronym or abbreviation for a word.
    This feature is obsolete. Although it may still work in some browsers, its
    use is discouraged since it could be removed at any time. Try to avoid using
    it. This element has been removed in HTML5.  Use <abbr> element.
    The HTML <address> element supplies contact information for its nearest
    <article> or <body> ancestor; in the latter case, it applies to the whole
    document.
    
      * To represent an arbitrary address, one that is not related to the
        contact information, use a <p> element rather than the <address>
        element.
    
      * This element should not contain more information than the contact
        information, like a publication date (which belongs in a <time>
        element).
    
      * Typically an <address> element can be placed inside the <footer>
        element of the current section, if any.
    Deprecated
    The <applet> tag defines an embedded applet. Note: There is still some
    support for the <applet> tag in some browsers, but it requires additional
    plug-ins/installations to work. The <applet> tag is not supported in HTML5.
    Use <embed> or <object> instead.
    The HTML <area> element defines a hot-spot region on an image, and
    optionally associates it with a hypertext link. This element is used only
    within a <map> element.
    The HTML <article> element represents a self-contained composition in a
    document, page, application, or site, which is intended to be independently
    distributable or reusable (e.g., in syndication). This could be a forum
    post, a magazine or newspaper article, a blog entry, an object, or any other
    independent item of content. Each <article> should be identified, typically
    by including a heading (<h1>-<h6> element) as a child of the <article>
    element.
    
      * When an <article> element is nested, the inner element represents an
        article related to the outer element. For example, the comments of a
        blog post can be <article> elements nested in the <article> representing
        the blog post.
    
      * Author information of an <article> element can be provided through the
        <address> element, but it doesn't apply to nested <article> elements.
    
      * The publication date and time of an <article> element can be described
        using the datetime attribute of a <time> element. Note that the pubdate
        attribute of <time> is no longer a part of the W3C HTML 5 standard.
    The HTML <aside> element represents a section of the page with content
    connected tangentially to the rest, which could be considered separate from
    that content. These sections are often represented as sidebars or inserts.
    They often contain the definitions on the sidebars, such as definitions from
    the glossary; there may also be other types of information, such as related
    advertisements; the biography of the author; web applications; profile
    information or related links on the blog.
    
      * Do not use the <aside> element to tag parenthesized text, as this kind
        of text is considered part of the main flow.
    The HTML <audio> element is used to embed sound content in documents. It may
    contain one or more audio sources, represented using the src attribute or
    the <source> element; the browser will choose the most suitable one.
    Fallback content for browsers not supporting the <audio> element can be
    added too, inside the opening and closing <audio></audio> tags.
    
    The most basic playback functionality can be made available using the
    controls attribute (see below); for more advanced usage, audio playback and
    controls can be manipulated using the HTML Media API, and more specifically
    the features defined in the HTMLAudioElement interface. You can also use
    the Web Audio API to directly generate and manipulate audio streams from
    JavaScript code. See Web Audio API for details.
    
      * Permitted content: If the element has a src attribute: zero or more
        <track> elements, followed by transparent content that contains no
        media elements — that is, no <audio> or <video> elements.
    
      * Else: zero or more <source> elements, followed by zero or more
        <track> elements, followed by transparent content that contains no
        media elements, that is no <audio> or <video> elements.
    
    Currently, there are 3 supported file formats for the <audio> element: MP3,
    Wav, and Ogg, with the following MIME types respectively: audio/mpeg,
    audio/wav and audio/wav.
    The HTML <b> Element represents a span of text stylistically different from
    normal text, without conveying any special importance or relevance. It is
    typically used for keywords in a summary, product names in a review, or
    other spans of text whose typical presentation would be boldfaced. Another
    example of its use is to mark the lead sentence of each paragraph of an
    article.
    
      * Do not confuse the <b> element with the <strong>, <em>, or <mark>
        elements. The <strong> element represents text of certain importance,
        <em> puts some emphasis on the text and the <mark> element represents
        text of certain relevance. The <b> element doesn't convey such special
        semantic information; use it only when no others fit.
    
      * Similarly, do not mark titles and headings using the <b> element. For
        this purpose, use the <h1> to <h6> tags. Further, stylesheets can change
        the default style of these elements, with the result that they are not
        necessarily displayed in bold.
    
      * It is a good practice to use the class attribute on the <b> in order to
        convey additional semantic information (for example <b class="lead">
        for the first sentence in a paragraph). This eases the development of
        several stylings of a web document, without the need to change its HTML
        code.
    
      * Historically, the <b> element was meant to make text boldface. Styling
        information has been deprecated since HTML4, so the meaning of the <b>
        element has been changed.
    
      * If there is no semantic purpose on using the <b> element, using css
        property font-weight with bold value would be a better choice for
        making text bold.
    The HTML <base> element specifies the base URL to use for all relative URLs
    contained within a document. There can be only one <base> element in a
    document. The base URL of a document can be queried from a script using
    document.baseURI. Note: If multiple <base> elements are specified, only the
    first href and first target value are used; all others are ignored.
    Deprecated
    The HTML basefont element (<basefont>) establishes a default font size for a
    document. Font size then can be varied relative to the base font size using
    the <font> element.
    
    Do not use this element! Though once (imprecisely) normalized in HTML 3.2, it
    wasn't supported in all major browsers. Further, browsers, and even
    successive versions of browsers, never implemented it in the same way:
    practically, using it has always brought indeterminate results.
    
    The <basefont> element was deprecated in the standard at the same time as all
    elements related to styling only. Starting with HTML 4, HTML does not convey
    styling information anymore (outside the <style> element or the style
    attribute of each element). In HTML5, this element has been removed
    completely. For any new web development, styling should be written using CSS
    only.
    
    The former behavior of the <font> element can be achieved, and even better
    controlled using the CSS Fonts properties.
    The HTML <bdi> Element (or Bi-Directional Isolation Element) isolates a span
    of text that might be formatted in a different direction from other text
    outside it. This element is useful when embedding text with an unknown
    directionality, from a database for example, inside text with a fixed
    directionality.
    
    Though the same visual effect can be achieved using the CSS rule
    unicode-bidi: isolate on a <span> or another text-formatting element, the
    semantic meaning is only conveyed by the <bdi> element.  Especially,
    browsers are allowed to ignore CSS styling. In such a case, the text would
    still be correctly displayed using the HTML element, but will become garbage
    when using the CSS styling to convey semantic.
    The HTML <bdo> Element (or HTML bidirectional override element) is used to
    override the current directionality of text. It causes the directionality of
    the characters to be ignored in favor of the specified directionality.
    Deprecated
    The HTML Big Element (<big>) makes the text font size one size bigger (for
    example, from small to medium, or from large to x-large) up to the browser's
    maximum font size. Note: As it was purely presentational, this element has
    been removed in HTML5 and shouldn't be used anymore. Instead web developers
    should use CSS properties.
    The HTML <blockquote> Element (or HTML Block Quotation Element) indicates
    that the enclosed text is an extended quotation. Usually, this is rendered
    visually by indentation (see Notes for how to change it). A URL for the
    source of the quotation may be given using the cite attribute, while a text
    representation of the source can be given using the <cite> element. Example:
    
      <blockquote cite="http://www.worldwildlife.org/who/index.html">
        For 50 years, WWF has been protecting the future of nature. The
        world's leading conservation organization, WWF works in 100
        countries and is supported by 1.2 million members in the United
        States and close to 5 million globally.
      </blockquote>
    The HTML <body> Element represents the content of an HTML document. There
    can be only one <body> element in a document. All layout attributes are
    removed in HTML5.
    The HTML element line break <br> produces a line break in text
    (carriage-return). It is useful for writing a poem or an address, where the
    division of lines is significant.  Do not use <br> to increase the gap
    between lines of text; use the CSS margin property or the <p> element.
    The HTML <button> Element represents a clickable button. Inside a <button>
    element you can put content, like text or images. This is the difference
    between this element and buttons created with the <input> element. Always
    specify the type attribute for a <button> element. Different browsers use
    different default types for the <button> element. Note: If you use the
    <button> element in an HTML form, different browsers may submit different
    values. Use <input> to create buttons in an HTML form.
    The HTML <canvas> Element can be used to draw graphics via scripting
    (usually JavaScript). For example, it can be used to draw graphs, make photo
    compositions or even perform animations. You may (and should) provide
    alternate content inside the <canvas> block. That content will be rendered
    both on older browsers that don't support canvas and in browsers with
    JavaScript disabled.
    The HTML <caption> Element (or HTML Table Caption Element) represents the
    title of a table. Though it is always the first descendant of a <table>, its
    styling, using CSS, may place it elsewhere, relative to the table. Note:
    When the <table> element that is the parent of this <caption> is the only
    descendant of a <figure> element, use the <figcaption> element instead.
    Example:
    
      <table>
        <caption>Monthly savings</caption>
        <tr>
          <th>Month</th>
          <th>Savings</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
          <td>January</td>
          <td>$100</td>
        </tr>
      </table>
    Deprecated
    The HTML Center Element (<center>) is a block-level element that can contain
    paragraphs and other block-level and inline elements. The entire content of
    this element is centered horizontally within its containing element
    (typically, the <body>).
    
    This tag has been deprecated in HTML 4 (and XHTML 1) in favor of the CSS
    text-align property, which can be applied to the <div> element or to an
    individual <p>. For centering blocks, use other CSS properties like
    margin-left and margin-right and set them to auto (or set margin to 0
    auto).
    The HTML Citation Element (<cite>) represents a reference to a creative
    work. It must include the title of a work or a URL reference, which may be
    in an abbreviated form according to the conventions used for the addition of
    citation metadata.
    
      * A creative work may include a book, a paper, an essay, a poem, a score,
        a song, a script, a film, a TV show, a game, a sculpture, a painting, a
        theater production, a play, an opera, a musical, an exhibition, a legal
        case report, a computer program, a web site, a web page, a blog post or
        comment, a forum post or comment, a tweet, a written or oral statement,
        etc.
    
      * The W3C spec states that a reference to a creative work may include the
        author's name, while WHATWG has declared that it may not include a
        person's name under any circumstances.
    
      * Use the cite attribute on a <blockquote> or <q> element to reference an
        online resource for a source.
    The HTML Code Element (<code>) represents a fragment of computer code. By
    default, it is displayed in the browser's default monospace font. This tag
    is not deprecated, but it is possible to achieve richer effect with CSS.
    The HTML Table Column Element (<col>) defines a column within a table and is
    used for defining common semantics on all common cells. It is generally
    found within a <colgroup> element. This element allows styling columns using
    CSS, but only a few attributes will have an effect on the column (see the
    CSS 2.1 specification for a list).
    The HTML Table Column Group Element (<colgroup>) defines a group of columns
    within a table for formatting. The <colgroup> tag is useful for applying
    styles to entire columns, instead of repeating the styles for each cell, for
    each row. Note: The <colgroup> tag must be a child of a <table> element,
    after any <caption> elements and before any <thead>, <tbody>, <tfoot>, and
    <tr> elements. To define different properties to a column within a
    <colgroup>, use the <col> tag within the <colgroup> tag. Example:
    
      <table>
        <colgroup>
          <col span="2" style="background-color:red">
          <col style="background-color:yellow">
        </colgroup>
        <tr>
          <th>ISBN</th>
          <th>Title</th>
          <th>Price</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
          <td>3476896</td>
          <td>My first HTML</td>
          <td>$53</td>
        </tr>
      </table>
    The HTML <data> Element links a given content with a machine-readable
    translation. If the content is time- or date-related, the <time> must be
    used.
    The <datalist> tag specifies a list of pre-defined options for an <input>
    element. The <datalist> tag is used to provide an "autocomplete" feature
    on <input> elements. Users will see a drop-down list of pre-defined options
    as they input data. Use the <input> element's list attribute to bind it
    together with a <datalist> element. Example:
    
      <input list="browsers">
    
      <datalist id="browsers">
        <option value="Internet Explorer">
        <option value="Firefox">
        <option value="Chrome">
        <option value="Opera">
        <option value="Safari">
      </datalist>
    The HTML <dd> element (HTML Description Element) indicates the description
    of a term in a description list (<dl>) element. This element can occur only
    as a child element of a description list and it must follow a <dt> element.
    Example:
    
      <dl>
        <dt>Coffee</dt>
        <dd>Black hot drink</dd>
        <dt>Milk</dt>
        <dd>White cold drink</dd>
      </dl>
    The HTML Deleted Text Element (<del>) represents a range of text that has
    been deleted from a document. This element is often (but need not be)
    rendered with strike-through text.
    The <details> tag specifies additional details that the user can view or
    hide on demand. The <details> tag can be used to create an interactive
    widget that the user can open and close. Any sort of content can be put
    inside the <details> tag. The content of a <details> element should not be
    visible unless the open attribute is set. Example:
    
      <details>
        <summary>Some details</summary>
        <p>More info about the details.</p>
      </details>
    
    The <summary> tag is used to specify a visible heading for the details.
    The heading can be clicked to view/hide the details.
    The HTML Definition Element (<dfn>) represents the defining instance of a
    term.
    
       * The <dfn> element marks the term being defined; the definition of the
         term should be given by the surrounding <p>, <section> or definition
         list group (usually a <dt>, <dd> pair).
    
       * The exact value of the term being defined is determined by the
         following rules:
         - If the <dfn> element has a title attribute, then the term is the
           value of that attribute.
         - Else, if it contains only an <abbr> element with a title attribute,
           then the term is the value of that attribute.
         - Otherwise, the text content of the <dfn> element is the term being
           defined.
    The HTML <dialog> element represents a dialog box or other interactive
    component, such as an inspector or window. <form> elements can be integrated
    within a dialog by specifying them with the attribute method="dialog".
    When such a form is submitted, the dialog is closed with a returnValue
    attribute set to the value of the submit button used.
    
    The ::backdrop CSS pseudo-element can be used to style behind a <dialog>
    element, for example to dim inaccessible content whilst a modal dialog is
    active.
    Deprecated
    The HTML directory element (<dir>) represents a directory, namely a
    collection of filenames. Note: Do not use this element. Though present in
    the early HTML specification, it has been deprecated in HTML 4, then is
    obsolete in HTML5. Use the <ul> instead.
    The HTML <div> element (or HTML Document Division Element) is the generic
    container for flow content, which does not inherently represent anything. It
    can be used to group elements for styling purposes (using the class or id
    attributes), or because they share attribute values, such as lang. It should
    be used only when no other semantic element (such as <article> or <nav>) is
    appropriate.
    The HTML <dl> element (or HTML Description List Element) encloses a list of
    pairs of terms and descriptions. Common uses for this element are to
    implement a glossary or to display metadata (a list of key-value pairs).
    Prior to HTML5, <dl> was known as a Definition List.
    The HTML <dt> element (or HTML Definition Term Element) identifies a term in
    a definition list. This element can occur only as a child element of a <dl>.
    It is usually followed by a <dd> element; however, multiple <dt> elements in
    a row indicate several terms that are all defined by the immediate next <dd>
    element.
    Deprecated
    The HTML <element> element is used to define new custom DOM elements.
    Note: This tag has been removed from the specification. See this for more
    information from the editor of the specification.
    The HTML element emphasis  <em> marks text that has stress emphasis. The
    <em> element can be nested, with each level of nesting indicating a greater
    degree of emphasis. Note: Typically this element is displayed in italic
    type. However, it should not be used simply to apply italic styling; use the
    CSS styling for that purpose. Use the <cite> element to mark the title of a
    work (book, play, song, etc.); it is also typically styled with italic type,
    but carries different meaning. Use the <strong> element to mark text that
    has greater importance than surrounding text.
    The HTML <embed> Element represents an integration point for an external
    application or interactive content (in other words, a plug-in). See other
    elements that are used for embedding content of various types include
    <audio>, <canvas>, <iframe>, <img>, <math>, <object>, <svg>, and <video>.
    The HTML <fieldset> element is used to group several controls as well as
    labels (<label>) within a web form. Note: unlike almost any other element,
    the WHATWG HTML Rendering spec suggests min-width: min-content as part of
    the default style for <fieldset>, and many browsers implement such styling
    (or something that approximates it). Example:
    
      <form action="test.php" method="post">
        <fieldset>
          <legend>Title</legend>
          <input type="radio" id="radio"> <label for="radio">Click me</label>
        </fieldset>
      </form>
    The HTML <figcaption> element represents a caption or a legend associated
    with a figure or an illustration described by the rest of the data of the
    <figure> element which is its immediate ancestor which means <figcaption>
    can be the first or last element inside a <figure> block. Also, the HTML
    Figcaption Element is optional; if not provided, then the parent figure
    element will have no caption.
    The HTML <figure> element represents self-contained content, frequently with
    a caption (<figcaption>), and is typically referenced as a single unit.
    While it is related to the main flow, its position is independent of the
    main flow. Usually this is an image, an illustration, a diagram, a code
    snippet, or a schema that is referenced in the main text, but that can be
    moved to another page or to an appendix without affecting the main flow.
    
      * Being a sectioning root, the outline of the content of the <figure>
        element is excluded from the main outline of the document.
    
      * A caption can be associated with the <figure> element by inserting
        a <figcaption> inside it (as the first or the last child).
    
    Example:
    
      <figure>
        <img src="https://developer.cdn.mozilla.net/media/img/mdn-logo-sm.png"
             alt="An awesome picture">
        <figcaption>Fig1. MDN Logo</figcaption>
      </figure>
    Deprecated
    The HTML Font Element (<font>) defines the font size, color and face for its
    content. Do not use this element! Though once normalized in HTML 3.2, it
    was deprecated in HTML 4.01, at the same time as all elements related to
    styling only, then obsoleted in HTML5.  Starting with HTML 4, HTML does not
    convey styling information anymore (outside the <style> element or the style
    attribute of each element). For any new web development, styling should be
    written using CSS only. The former behavior of the <font> element can be
    achieved, and even better controlled using the CSS Fonts CSS properties.
    The HTML <footer> element represents a footer for its nearest sectioning
    content or sectioning root element. A footer typically contains information
    about the author of the section, copyright data or links to related
    documents. Notes: Enclose information about the author in an <address>
    element that can be included into the <footer> element.  The <footer>
    element is not sectioning content and therefore doesn't introduce a new
    section in the outline.
    The HTML <form> element represents a document section that contains
    interactive controls to submit information to a web server. It is possible
    to use the :valid and :invalid CSS pseudo-classes to style a <form>
    element. Example:
    
      <form action="" method="post">
        <fieldset>
          <legend>Title</legend>
          <input type="radio" id="radio">
          <label for="radio">Click me</label>
        </fieldset>
      </form>
    Deprecated
    <frame> is an HTML element which defines a particular area in which another
    HTML document can be displayed. A frame should be used within a <frameset>.
    Using the <frame> element is not encouraged because of certain disadvantages
    such as performance problems and lack of accessibility for users with screen
    readers. Instead of the <frame> element, <iframe> may be preferred.
    Deprecated
    <frameset> is an HTML element which is used to contain <frame> elements.
    Note: Because the use of frames is now discouraged in favor of using
    <iframe>, this element is not typically used by modern web sites.
    The HTML <head> element provides general information (metadata) about the
    document, including its title and links to its scripts and style sheets.
    Modern, HTML5-compliant browsers automatically construct a <head> element if
    the tags are omitted in the markup. This behavior cannot be guaranteed in
    ancient browsers.
    The HTML <header> element represents a group of introductory or navigational
    aids. It may contain some heading elements but also other elements like a
    logo, wrapped section's header, a search form, and so on. Note: The <header>
    element is not sectioning content and therefore doesn't introduce a new
    section in the outline. Example:
    
      <header>
        <h1>Main Page Title</h1>
        <img src="mdn-logo-sm.png" alt="MDN logo">
      </header>
    The HTML <hr> element represents a thematic break between paragraph-level
    elements (for example, a change of scene in a story, or a shift of topic
    with a section). In previous versions of HTML, it represented a horizontal
    rule. It may still be displayed as a horizontal rule in visual browsers, but
    is now defined in semantic terms, rather than presentational terms. To
    change look of rule or gaps between it and paragraphs, use Cascading Style
    Sheets (CSS).
    The HTML <html> element (or HTML root element) represents the root of an
    HTML document. All other elements must be descendants of this element. Since
    the <html> element is the first in a document other than comments, it is
    called the root element. Although this tag can be implied, or not required,
    with HTML, it is required to be opened and closed in XHTML.
    The HTML <i> Element represents a range of text that is set off from the
    normal text for some reason, for example, technical terms, foreign language
    phrases, or fictional character thoughts. It is typically displayed in
    italic type.
    The HTML Inline Frame Element (<iframe>) represents a nested browsing
    context, effectively embedding another HTML page into the current page.
    In HTML 4.01, a document may contain a head and a body or a head and a
    frameset, but not both a body and a frameset. However, an <iframe> can
    be used within a normal document body. Each browsing context has its own
    session history and active document. The browsing context that contains
    the embedded content is called the parent browsing context. The top-level
    browsing context (which has no parent) is typically the browser window.
    The HTML <img> element represents an image in the document. Note: Browsers
    do not always display the image referenced by the element. This is the case
    for non-graphical browsers (including those used by people with vision
    impairments), if the user chooses not to display images, or if the browser
    cannot display the image because it is invalid or an unsupported type. In
    these cases, the browser may replace the image with the text defined in this
    element's alt attribute.
    The HTML element <input> is used to create interactive controls for
    web-based forms in order to accept data from the user. How an <input> works
    varies considerably depending on the value of its type attribute.
    The HTML <ins> Element (or HTML Inserted Text) HTML represents a range of
    text that has been added to a document.
    The HTML Keyboard Input Element (<kbd>) represents user input and produces
    an inline element displayed in the browser's default monospace font.
    Deprecated
    The HTML <keygen> element exists to facilitate generation of key material,
    and submission of the public key as part of an HTML form. This mechanism is
    designed for use with Web-based certificate management systems. It is
    expected that the <keygen> element will be used in an HTML form along with
    other information needed to construct a certificate request, and that the
    result of the process will be a signed certificate. Example:
    
      <form action="demo_keygen.asp" method="get">
        Username: <input type="text" name="usr_name">
        Encryption: <keygen name="security">
        <input type="submit">
      </form>
    
    Note: There is currently discussion among Web browser makers whether to keep
    this feature or not. Until a decision is reached, it is better to continue
    to consider this feature as deprecated and going away.
    The HTML Label Element (<label>) represents a caption for an item in a user
    interface. It can be associated with a control either by placing the control
    element inside the <label> element, or by using the for attribute. Such a
    control is called the labeled control of the label element. One input can be
    associated with multiple labels.
    
    It's worth noting, however, that labels are not themselves directly
    associated with forms. They are only indirectly associated with forms
    through the controls with which they're associated.
    
    Prior to a revision to the HTML specification made on April 28, 2016, the
    <label> element's form attribute allowed directly associating labels with
    forms.
    The HTML <legend> Element (or HTML Legend Field Element) represents a
    caption for the content of its parent <fieldset>.
    The HTML <li> element (or HTML List Item Element) is used to represent an
    item in a list. It must be contained in a parent element: an ordered list
    (<ol>), an unordered list (<ul>), or a menu (<menu>). In menus and unordered
    lists, list items are usually displayed using bullet points. In ordered
    lists, they are usually displayed with an ascending counter on the left,
    such as a number or letter.
    The HTML <link> element specifies relationships between the current document
    and an external resource. Possible uses for this element include defining a
    relational framework for navigation. This Element is most used to link to
    style sheets.
    The HTML <main> element represents the main content of the <body> of a
    document or application. The main content area consists of content that is
    directly related to, or expands upon the central topic of a document or the
    central functionality of an application. This content should be unique to
    the document, excluding any content that is repeated across a set of
    documents such as sidebars, navigation links, copyright information, site
    logos, and search forms (unless the document's main function is as a search
    form).
    
    Note: <main> must not be a descendent of an <article>, <aside>, <footer>,
    <header>, or <nav> element. Only one main element can be used per
    document.
    The HTML <map> element is used with <area> elements to define an image map
    (a clickable link area).
    The HTML Mark Element (<mark>) represents highlighted text, i.e., a run of
    text marked for reference purpose, due to its relevance in a particular
    context. For example it can be used in a page showing search results to
    highlight every instance of the searched-for word.
    
      * In a quotation or another block, the highlighted text typically marks
        text that is referenced outside the quote, or marked for specific
        scrutiny even though the original author didn't consider it important.
    
      * In the main text, the highlighted text typically marks text that may
        be of special relevance for the user's current activity, like search
        results.
    
      * Do not use the <mark> element for syntax highlighting; use the <span>
        element for this purpose.
    
      * Do not confuse the <mark> element with the <strong> element. The
        <strong> element is used to denote spans of text of importance in
        context of the text, when the <mark> element is used to denote spans
        of text of relevance to a different context.
    The HTML <menu> element represents a group of commands that a user can
    perform or activate. This includes both list menus, which might appear
    across the top of a screen, as well as context menus, such as those that
    might appear underneath a button after it has been clicked. Note: The <menu>
    and <ul> elements both represent an unordered list of items. The key
    difference is that <ul> primarily contains items for display, whilst <menu>
    is intended for interactive items, to act on.
    The HTML <menuitem> element represents a command that a user is able to
    invoke through a popup menu. This includes context menus, as well as menus
    that might be attached to a menu button.
    
    A command can either be defined explicitly, with a textual label and optional
    icon to describe its appearance, or alternatively as an indirect command
    whose behavior is defined by a separate element. Commands can also
    optionally include a checkbox or be grouped to share radio buttons. (Menu
    items for indirect commands gain checkboxes or radio buttons when defined
    against elements <input type="checkbox"> and <input type="radio">.)
    The HTML <meta> element represents any metadata information that cannot be
    represented by one of the other HTML meta-related elements (<base>, <link>,
    <script>, <style> or <title>).
    
    Depending on the attributes set, the kind of metadata can be one of the
    following:
    
      * If name is set, it is document-level metadata, applying to the whole
        page.
    
      * If http-equiv is set, it is a pragma directive, i.e. information
        normally given by the web server about how the web page should be served.
    
      * If charset is set, it is a charset declaration, i.e. the charset used for
        the serialized form of the webpage.
    
      * If itemprop is set, it is user-defined metadata, transparent for the
        user-agent as the semantics of the metadata is user-specific.
    The HTML <meter> Element represents either a scalar value within a known
    range or a fractional value. Note: Unless the value attribute is between 0
    and 1 (inclusive), the min and max attributes should define the range so
    that the value attribute's value is within it. Example:
    
      <p>
        Heat the oven to
        <meter min="200" max="500" value="350">
          350 degrees
        </meter>.
      </p>
    The HTML <nav> element (HTML Navigation Element) represents a section of a
    page that links to other pages or to parts within the page: a section with
    navigation links.
    
      * Not all links of a document must be in a <nav> element, which is
        intended only for major block of navigation links; typically the
        <footer> element often has a list of links that don't need to be
        in a <nav> element.
    
      * A document may have several <nav> elements, for example, one for
        site navigation and one for intra-page navigation.
    
      * User agents, such as screen readers targeting disabled users, can
        use this element to determine whether to omit the initial rendering
        of this content.
    Deprecated
    <noframes> is an HTML element which is used to supporting browsers which are
    not able to support <frame> elements or configured to do so. You can use any
    HTML element inside of <noframes> which are expected to be seen inside of
    <body> element, except <frameset> and <frame> elements. Note: Because of the
    fact that all mainstream browsers support frames, usage of this element is
    not necessary in general cases. It is also entirely obsolete in HTML5 and
    should be avoided to conform to the standard.
    The HTML <noscript> Element defines a section of html to be inserted if a
    script type on the page is unsupported or if scripting is currently turned
    off in the browser.
    The HTML Embedded Object Element (<object>) represents an external resource,
    which can be treated as an image, a nested browsing context, or a resource
    to be handled by a plugin.
    The HTML <ol> Element (or HTML Ordered List Element) represents an ordered
    list of items. Typically, ordered-list items are displayed with a preceding
    numbering, which can be of any form, like numerals, letters or Romans
    numerals or even simple bullets. This numbered style is not defined in the
    HTML description of the page, but in its associated CSS, using the
    list-style-type property.
    
    There is no limitation to the depth and overlap of lists defined with the
    <ol> and <ul> elements.
    
    Note: The <ol> and <ul> both represent a list of items. They differ in the
    way that, with the <ol> element, the order is meaningful. As a rule of thumb
    to determine which one to use, try changing the order of the list items; if
    the meaning is changed, the <ol> element should be used, else the <ul> is
    adequate.
    In a Web form, the HTML <optgroup> element creates a grouping of options
    within a <select> element. Example:
    
      <select>
        <optgroup label="Group 1">
          <option>Option 1.1</option>
        </optgroup>
        <optgroup label="Group 2">
          <option>Option 2.1</option>
          <option>Option 2.2</option>
        </optgroup>
        <optgroup label="Group 3" disabled>
          <option>Option 3.1</option>
          <option>Option 3.2</option>
          <option>Option 3.3</option>
        </optgroup>
      </select>
    In a Web form, the HTML <option> element is used to create a control
    representing an item within a <select>, an <optgroup> or a <datalist> HTML5
    element.
    The HTML <output> element represents the result of a calculation or user
    action. Example:
    
      <form oninput="result.value=parseInt(a.value)+parseInt(b.value)">
        <input type="range" name="b" value="50" /> +
        <input type="number" name="a" value="10" /> =
        <output name="result">60</output>
      </form>
    The HTML <p> element (or HTML Paragraph Element) represents a paragraph of
    text. Paragraphs are usually represented in visual media as blocks of text
    that are separated from adjacent blocks by vertical blank space and/or
    first-line indentation. The paragraph must be closed at end of the text
    "<p> text </p>" are requried to put the text between the paragraph.
    Paragraphs are block-level elements. Note: To change gaps between
    paragraphs, use the CSS margin property. Do not insert empty paragraphs
    elements or <br> between them.
    The HTML <param> Element (or HTML Parameter Element) defines parameters
    for <object>.
    The HTML <pre> element (or HTML Preformatted Text) represents preformatted
    text. Text within this element is typically displayed in a non-proportional
     ("monospace") font exactly as it is laid out in the file. Whitespace
    inside this element is displayed as typed. Note: you will need to escape any
    contained '<' characters as '&lt;' to make sure enclosed code is not
    interpreted as markup.
    [HTML5] The HTML <progress> Element is used to view the completion progress
    of a task. While the specifics of how it's displayed is left up to the
    browser developer, it's typically displayed as a progress bar. Javascript
    can be used to manipulate the value of progress bar. Example:
    
      <progress value="70" max="100">70 %</progress>
    The HTML Quote Element (<q>) indicates that the enclosed text is a short
    inline quotation. This element is intended for short quotations that don't
    require paragraph breaks; for long quotations use <blockquote> element.
    Note: Most modern standards-aware browsers, like Mozilla Firefox, Opera, and
    Safari, should add quotes around text enclosed within the <q> element.  Some
    browsers, like Internet Explorer, may not make any sort of style change for
    quotations, but it is possible to apply a style rule. Example:
    
      <p>Everytime Kenny is killed, Stan will announce
        <q cite="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenny_McCormick#Cultural_impact">
          Oh my God, you/they killed Kenny!
        </q>.
      </p>
    The HTML <rp> element is used to provide fall-back parenthesis for browsers
    non-supporting ruby annotations. Ruby annotations are for showing
    pronunciation of East Asian characters, like using Japanese furigana or
    Taiwainese bopomofo characters. The <rp> element is used in the case of lack
    of <ruby> element support its content has what should be displayed in order
    to indicate the presence of a ruby annotation, usually parentheses.
    The HTML <rt> Element embraces pronunciation of characters presented in a
    ruby annotations, which are used to describe the pronunciation of East Asian
    characters. This element is always used inside a <ruby> element.
    The HTML <rtc> Element embraces semantic annotations of characters presented
    in a ruby of <rb> elements used inside of <ruby> element. <rb> elements can
    have both pronunciation (<rt>) and semantic (<rtc>) annotations.
    The HTML <ruby> Element represents a ruby annotation. Ruby annotations are
    for showing pronunciation of East Asian characters. Example:
    
      <ruby>
        漢 <rp>(</rp><rt>Kan</rt><rp>)</rp>
        字 <rp>(</rp><rt>ji</rt><rp>)</rp>
      </ruby>
    The HTML Strikethrough Element (<s>) renders text with a strikethrough, or a
    line through it. Use the <s> element to represent things that are no longer
    relevant or no longer accurate. However, <s> is not appropriate when
    indicating document edits; for that, use the <del> and <ins> elements, as
    appropriate.
    The HTML <samp> element is an element intended to identify sample output
    from a computer program. It is usually displayed in the browser's default
    monotype font (such as Lucida Console).
    The HTML Script Element (<script>) is used to embed or reference an
    executable script within an HTML or XHTML document. Scripts without async or
    defer attributes, as well as inline scripts, are fetched and executed
    immediately, before the browser continues to parse the page.
    The HTML <section> element represents a generic section of a document, i.e.,
    a thematic grouping of content, typically with a heading. Each <section>
    should be identified, typically by including a heading (<h1>-<h6> element)
    as a child of the <section> element.
    
      * If it makes sense to separately syndicate the content of a <section>
        element, use an <article> element instead.
    
      * Do not use the <section> element as a generic container; this is what
        <div> is for, especially when the sectioning is only for styling
        purposes. A rule of thumb is that a section should logically appear
        in the outline of a document.
    The HTML select (<select>) element represents a control that presents a menu
    of options. The options within the menu are represented by <option>
    elements, which can be grouped by <optgroup> elements. Options can be
    pre-selected for the user.
    The HTML <shadow> element is used as a shadow DOM insertion point. You might
    use it if you have created multiple shadow roots under a shadow host. It is
    not useful in ordinary HTML. It is used with Web Components.
    The HTML Small Element (<small>) makes the text font size one size smaller
    (for example, from large to medium, or from small to x-small) down to the
    browser's minimum font size.  In HTML5, this element is repurposed to
    represent side-comments and small print, including copyright and legal text,
    independent of its styled presentation.
    The HTML <source> element specifies multiple media resources for either the
    <picture>, the <audio> or the <video> element. It is an empty element. It is
    commonly used to serve the same media content in multiple formats supported
    by different browsers. Example:
    
      <video controls>
        <source src="foo.webm" type="video/webm">
        <source src="foo.ogg" type="video/ogg">
        <source src="foo.mov" type="video/quicktime">
        I'm sorry; your browser doesn't support HTML5 video.
      </video>
    The HTML <span> element is a generic inline container for phrasing content,
    which does not inherently represent anything. It can be used to group
    elements for styling purposes (using the class or id attributes), or because
    they share attribute values, such as lang. It should be used only when no
    other semantic element is appropriate. <span> is very much like a <div>
    element, but <div> is a block-level element whereas a <span> is an inline
    element.
    The HTML Strong Element (<strong>) gives text strong importance, and is
    typically displayed in bold.
    
    BOLD vs. STRONG
    It is often confusing to new developers why there are so many ways to express
    the same thing on a rendered website. Bold and Strong are perhaps one of the
    most common. Why use <strong></strong> vs <b></b>? You have to type a whole
    lot more with strong and it produces the exact same result, right?
    
    Perhaps not; strong is a logical state, and bold is a physical state. Logical
    states separate presentation from the content, and by doing so allow for it
    to be expressed in many different ways. Perhaps instead of rendering some
    text as bold you want to render it red, or a different size, or underlined,
    or whatever. It makes more sense to change the presentational properties of
    strong than it does bold. This is because bold is a physical state; there is
    no separation of presentation and content, and making bold do anything other
    than bold text would be confusing and illogical.
    
    It is important to note that <b></b> does have other uses, when one wants to
    draw attention without increasing importance.
    
    EMPHASIS vs. STRONG
    While in HTML4, Strong simply indicated a stronger emphasis, in HTML5, the
    element is described as representing "strong importance for its contents."
    This is an important distinction to make. While Emphasis is used to change
    the meaning of a sentence ("I /love/ carrots" vs. "I love /carrots/"),
    Strong is used to give portions of a sentence added importance (e.g.,
    "*Warning!*  This is *very dangerous*.") Both Strong and Emphasis can be
    nested to increase the relative degree of importance or stress emphasis,
    respectively.
    The HTML <style> element contains style information for a document, or part
    of a document. By default, the style instructions written inside that
    element are expected to be CSS.
    The HTML Subscript Element (<sub>) defines a span of text that should be
    displayed, for typographic reasons, lower, and often smaller, than the main
    span of text.
    
      * This element should be used for typographical reasons only, i.e.
        changing the position of the text changing its meaning like in
        mathematical (like t2, though the use of a MathML formula should
        be considered) or chemical formulas (like H2O).
    
      * This element must not be used for styling purpose like the styling
        of the product name Latex. In that case CSS style should be used:
        the vertical-align property with the sub value will achieve the same
        effect.
    The HTML summary element (<summary>) is used as a summary, caption, or
    legend for the content of a <details> element. Note: (1) If the <summary>
    element is omitted, the heading "details" will be used. (2) The default
    style for <summary> is display:list-item per HTML standard. If the style is
    being changed to display:block, the disclosure triangle will be dismissed,
    which is expected.
    The HTML Superscript Element (<sup>) defines a span of text that should be
    displayed, for typographic reasons, higher, and often smaller, than the main
    span of text.
    
      * This element should be used for typographical reasons only, i.e.
        changing the position of the text changing its meaning like in
        mathematical (like f4, though the use of a MathML formula should be
        considered) or in French abbreviations (like Mlle, Mme or Cie).
    
      * This element must not be used for styling purpose like the styling of
        the product name Latex. In that case CSS style should be used: the
        vertical-align property with the super value will achieve the same
        effect.
    The HTML Table Element (<table>) represents tabular data - i.e., information
    expressed via a two dimensional data table. Note: Prior to the creation of
    CSS, HTML <table> elements were often used as a method for page layout. This
    usage has been discouraged since HTML 4. However, HTML emails are an
    exception where tables are still commonly used for layout purposes. The
    reason for this is poor CSS support in popular email clients.
    The HTML Table Body Element (<tbody>) defines one or more <tr> element
    data-rows to be the body of its parent <table> element (as long as no <tr>
    elements are immediate children of that table element.) In conjunction with
    a preceding <thead> and/or <tfoot> element, <tbody> provides additional
    semantic information for devices such as printers and displays. Of the
    parent table's child elements, <tbody> represents the content which, when
    longer than a page, will most likely differ for each page printed; while the
    content of <thead> and <tfoot> will be the same or similar for each page
    printed. For displays, <tbody> will enable separate scrolling of the
    <thead>, <tfoot>, and <caption> elements of the same parent <table> element.
    Note that unlike the <thead>, <tfoot>, and <caption> elements however,
    multiple <tbody> elements are permitted (if consecutive), allowing the
    data-rows in long tables to be divided into different sections, each
    separately formatted as needed.
    The Table cell HTML element (<td>) defines a cell of a table that contains
    data. It participates in the table model.
    The HTML template element <template> is a mechanism for holding client-side
    content that is not to be rendered when a page is loaded but may
    subsequently be instantiated during runtime using JavaScript. Think of a
    template as a content fragment that is being stored for subsequent use in
    the document. While the parser does process the contents of the <template>
    element while loading the page, it does so only to ensure that those
    contents are valid; the element's contents are not rendered, however.
    The HTML <textarea> element represents a multi-line plain-text editing
    control. A textarea has intrinsic dimensions, like a raster image. Example:
    
      <textarea name="textarea" rows="10" cols="50">
        Write something here
     </textarea>
    The HTML Table Foot Element (<tfoot>) defines a set of rows summarizing the
    columns of the table.
    The HTML element table header cell <th> defines a cell as header of a group
    of table cells. The exact nature of this group is defined by the scope and
    headers attributes.
    The HTML Table Head Element (<thead>) defines a set of rows defining the
    head of the columns of the table.
    The HTML <time> element represents either a time on a 24-hour clock or a
    precise date in the Gregorian calendar (with optional time and timezone
    information). This element is intended to be used presenting dates and times
    in a machine readable format. This can be helpful for user agents to offer
    any event scheduling for user's calendar. Note: This element is not
    appropriate for instances where a specific date cannot be calculated, nor
    should it be used for dates prior to the introduction to the Gregorian
    calendar (due to complications with calculating those dates). Example:
    
      <p>
        The concert took place on
        <time datetime="2001-05-15T19:00">May 15</time>.
      </p>
    The HTML <title> element defines the title of the document, shown in a
    browser's title bar or on the page's tab. It can only contain text, and any
    contained tags are ignored.
    The HTML element table row <tr> defines a row of cells in a table. Those can
    be a mix of <td> and <th> elements.
    The HTML <track> element is used as a child of the media elements—<audio>
    and <video>. It lets you specify timed text tracks (or time-based data), for
    example to automatically handle subtitles. The tracks are formatted in
    WebVTT format (.vtt files) — Web Video Text Tracks. The type of data that
    track adds to the media is set in the kind attribute, which can take values
    of subtitles, captions, descriptions, chapters or metadata. The element
    points to a source file containing timed text that the browser exposes when
    the user requests additional data. A media element cannot have more than one
    track with the same kind, srclang, and label.
    The HTML Underline Element (<u>) renders text with an underline, a line
    under the baseline of its content. In HTML5, this element represents a span
    of text with an unarticulated, though explicitly rendered, non-textual
    annotation, such as labeling the text as being a proper name in Chinese text
    (a Chinese proper name mark), or labeling the text as being misspelled.
    Note: As with all purely styling elements, <u> has been deprecated in HTML 4
    and XHTML 1, but it has been re-introduced in HTML5 with other semantics. If
    you want to underline text in a non-semantic manner, you should use a <span>
    element, or another semantically appropriate element, and style it with the
    CSS text-decoration property, with the underline value.
    The HTML <ul> element (or HTML Unordered List Element) represents an
    unordered list of items, namely a collection of items that do not have a
    numerical ordering, and their order in the list is meaningless. Typically,
    unordered-list items are displayed with a bullet, which can be of several
    forms, like a dot, a circle or a squared. The bullet style is not defined in
    the HTML description of the page, but in its associated CSS, using the
    list-style-type property.
    
    There is no limitation to the depth and imbrication of lists defined with the
    <ol> and <ul> elements.
    
    Note: The <ol> and <ul> elements both represent a list of items. They differ
    in that, with the <ol> element, the order is meaningful. As a rule of thumb
    to determine which one to use, try changing the order of the list items; if
    the meaning is changed, the <ol> element should be used, otherwise you can
    use <ul>.
    The HTML Variable Element (<var>) represents a variable in a mathematical
    expression or a programming context.
    Use the  HTML <video> element to embed video content in a document. The
    video element contains one or more video sources. To specify a video source,
    use either the src attribute or the <source> element; the browser will
    choose the most suitable one.
    The HTML element word break opportunity <wbr> represents a position within
    text where the browser may optionally break a line, though its line-breaking
    rules would not otherwise create a break at that location.
    
    On UTF-8 encoded pages, <wbr> behaves like the U+200B ZERO-WIDTH SPACE code
    point. In particular, it behaves like a Unicode bidi BN code point, meaning
    it has no effect on bidi-ordering: <div dir=rtl>123,<wbr>456</div> displays,
    when not broken on two lines, 123,456 and not 456,123.
    
    For the same reason, the <wbr> element does not introduce a hyphen at the
    line break point. To make a hyphen appear only at the end of a line, use the
    soft hyphen character entity (&shy;) instead.